[midvalleybirds] Western wood peewee

Savonen, Carol carol.savonen at oregonstate.edu
Fri Sep 13 17:19:37 PDT 2019


Today in Mary’s River Estates, west
Of Philomath 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 13, 2019, at 3:17 PM, "birding-request at midvalleybirding.org" <birding-request at midvalleybirding.org> wrote:
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> Today's Topics:
> 
>   1. Logsdon Ridge (Carma Sue Henry)
>   2. Flock of Cedar Waxwings.... (Marge Popp)
>   3. Corvallis Vaux's Swifts (Mary Garrard)
>   4. Re: [corvallis-birding] Corvallis Vaux's Swifts (MARK BALDWIN)
>   5. Re: Corvallis Vaux's Swifts (Roger Freeman)
>   6. Re: Corvallis Vaux's Swifts (nancy bee)
>   7. Fwd: American Avocet, phalaropes & more at Sheridan sewage
>      ponds 12 Sep (clearwater at peak.org)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2019 17:22:27 -0700
> From: Carma Sue Henry <cshenry at bywordofmind.com>
> Subject: [midvalleybirds] Logsdon Ridge
> To: birding at midvalleybirding.org
> Message-ID:
>    <201909130022.x8D0MURN179797 at jax4mhob21.registeredsite.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
> 
> About 20-25 Cedar Waxwings were hawking insects from the tops of the stand of dead Doug fir last evening.  First time we've seen them this year.  Juncos are coming back.  In the last few days several House Finches have started coming in to the sunflower seed feeders - much to the annoyance of the resident Red-breasted and White-breasted Nuthatches.  Watched a White-breasted fluff it's feathers and flap it's wings a one before resorting to a beak poke.  House Finches squabble amongst themselves so much they probably aren't too intimidated by a Nuthatch.Flocks of both American and Lesser Golfinches are thinning out, but still abundant.  We saw some begging/wing flutter activity mid-August but didn't know if it was unusual to have such a late brood as the Goldfinches in Seattle were very transient - didn't get a chance to do much observation.More Song Sparrows are coming in - we've had several show up recently with no (very cute - makes them look like tiny Kiwis) or very!
>  few tail feathers, yet able to maneuver very well without them.  Now they're all grown back in.  Seems to take about two weeks.  Saw fully tail-less SSp's last year as well.  I've only seen one other fully tail-less bird before (a Stellar's Jay in Seattle) and I don't know if this is common during a molt, or more of a Song Sparrow thing.  No Golden-crowned, White-crowned or White-throated Sparrows yet - all are abundant in winter.  I've been watching for Vesper Sparrows but haven't identified any yet.Black-headed Grosbeaks have been absent for about a week.  Evening Grosbeaks, which were infrequent in spring, have been fully absent since end of July.Acorn Woodpecker activity at the feeders has become very infrequent but they are working the oaks and doing a bit of insect hawking.For those who followed the injured Hairy Woodpecker story, I'm sad report that he has not been seen for over a week.  At last sighting he was eating the suet we'd put back into the depths !
> of the Spruce tree for him and getting around quite well by foot; star
> ting to try his wings. If there was'nt rain, we kept some of the branches sprayed and drippy so he'd have water. Both parents stayed nearby.  We haven't 'seen' any raccoons or coyotes in the yard; however Cooper's Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, a Merlin and Great-horned Owls are all active here.  We do have several skunks who can barely climb up the patio steps so it doesn't seem like they'd be able to go after even an injured bird in a tree.  I haven't seen any feathers.  Did hear a major ruckus last Sunday very early AM, when a hawk took something out of the Spruce, but didn't have my glasses on.  It seemed pretty large and heavy, so I think it was a squirrel. Having it happen so close to where the injured Hairy was sheltering doesn't bode well.  Both parents are still frequent visitors.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2019 18:18:42 -0700
> From: Marge Popp <marge at jyo.com>
> Subject: [midvalleybirds] Flock of Cedar Waxwings....
> To: birding at midvalleybirding.org
> Message-ID:
>    <CAKajegOuC7GzgGv2n+DJMKM7donNhx81VedfzzvjcBuQYSukeg at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
> 
> seen near the Dunawi Creek bike path near the Birdie Dr off-ramp this
> afternoon.
> Marge
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2019 21:04:13 -0700
> From: Mary Garrard <springazure1 at gmail.com>
> Subject: [midvalleybirds] Corvallis Vaux's Swifts
> To: "corvallis-birding at googlegroups.com"
>    <corvallis-birding at googlegroups.com>,    Midvalley birders
>    <birding at midvalleybirding.org>,    Mid-Valley Nature
>    <mid-valley-nature at googlegroups.com>,    "OBOL at oregonbirds.org"
>    <OBOL at oregonbirds.org>
> Cc: Beverly Clark <clark.bev9 at gmail.com>,    Larry Schwitters
>    <leschwitters at me.com>
> Message-ID: <B5C0EA53-3C7E-43D5-9B24-D6092152BEB5 at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=utf-8
> 
> Hi, Marge Alig and I and several neighbors observed 242 swifts enter a chimney at a private residence near Weigand Hall tonight. It was a lovely evening with a slight breeze and a few clouds to contrast against the pale pink sky at sunset. Sunset tonight was at 7:30. It’s always so much fun to watch the swifts as they swirl looselyl, then get more and more organized into a tighter group, then flutter down as they funnel into the chimney. It never gets old to me. 
> 
> This migration the numbers I’ve seen at the chimney near the Mongolian Grill off First street downtown, and now at this private residence, have been much lower than in the past, from 80 to 300 or so. In previous years we have often counted 1200-1500, and I have heard reports of up to 3000. 
> 
> Where are they?????
> 
> Happy fall migration!
> 
> Mary
> 
> 
> ___________
> My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness. The Dalai Lama
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2019 21:14:10 -0700 (PDT)
> From: MARK BALDWIN <mark.baldwin2 at comcast.net>
> Subject: [midvalleybirds] Re: [corvallis-birding] Corvallis Vaux's
>    Swifts
> To: Mary Garrard <springazure1 at gmail.com>,
>    corvallis-birding at googlegroups.com,    Midvalley birders
>    <birding at midvalleybirding.org>,    Mid-Valley Nature
>    <mid-valley-nature at googlegroups.com>,    OBOL at oregonbirds.org
> Cc: Beverly Clark <clark.bev9 at gmail.com>,    Larry Schwitters
>    <leschwitters at me.com>
> Message-ID: <1140069244.585589.1568348051189 at connect.xfinity.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
> 
> Hi Mary,
> 
> There have been at least a thousand swifts using the chimney of the Tri-Delt sorority near 26th and Harrison in Corvallis. 
> 
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Mark
> 
>> On September 12, 2019 at 9:04 PM Mary Garrard <springazure1 at gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>>    Hi, Marge Alig and I and several neighbors observed 242 swifts enter a chimney at a private residence near Weigand Hall tonight. It was a lovely evening with a slight breeze and a few clouds to contrast against the pale pink sky at sunset. Sunset tonight was at 7:30. It’s always so much fun to watch the swifts as they swirl looselyl, then get more and more organized into a tighter group, then flutter down as they funnel into the chimney. It never gets old to me. 
>> 
>>    This migration the numbers I’ve seen at the chimney near the Mongolian Grill off First street downtown, and now at this private residence, have been much lower than in the past, from 80 to 300 or so. In previous years we have often counted 1200-1500, and I have heard reports of up to 3000. 
>> 
>>    Where are they?????
>> 
>>    Happy fall migration!
>> 
>>    Mary
>> 
>> 
>>    ___________
>>    My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness. The Dalai Lama
>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>    --
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>>    To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to corvallis-birding+unsubscribe at googlegroups.com mailto:corvallis-birding+unsubscribe at googlegroups.com .
>>    To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/corvallis-birding/B5C0EA53-3C7E-43D5-9B24-D6092152BEB5%40gmail.com https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/corvallis-birding/B5C0EA53-3C7E-43D5-9B24-D6092152BEB5%40gmail.com?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer .
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 5
> Date: Fri, 13 Sep 2019 07:19:10 -0700
> From: Roger Freeman <freemanbecard at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [midvalleybirds] Corvallis Vaux's Swifts
> To: Mary Garrard <springazure1 at gmail.com>
> Cc: Beverly Clark <clark.bev9 at gmail.com>,    Larry Schwitters
>    <leschwitters at me.com>,    "corvallis-birding at googlegroups.com"
>    <corvallis-birding at googlegroups.com>,    Mid-Valley Nature
>    <mid-valley-nature at googlegroups.com>,    Midvalley birders
>    <birding at midvalleybirding.org>
> Message-ID:
>    <CAB7HMEy8eiwdAcN=KtSJh6RA3YnKCirVnhGFUT9LjaCOHGBcbA at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
> 
> I watched close to 1000 swirling and funneling Swifts at the Silverton
> Palace theatre chimney this past Tuesday evening (9/10) around 740-800 PM.
> 
> Roger Freeman
> 
>> On Thu, Sep 12, 2019 at 9:04 PM Mary Garrard <springazure1 at gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>> Hi, Marge Alig and I and several neighbors observed 242 swifts enter a
>> chimney at a private residence near Weigand Hall tonight. It was a lovely
>> evening with a slight breeze and a few clouds to contrast against the pale
>> pink sky at sunset. Sunset tonight was at 7:30. It’s always so much fun to
>> watch the swifts as they swirl looselyl, then get more and more organized
>> into a tighter group, then flutter down as they funnel into the chimney. It
>> never gets old to me.
>> 
>> This migration the numbers I’ve seen at the chimney near the Mongolian
>> Grill off First street downtown, and now at this private residence, have
>> been much lower than in the past, from 80 to 300 or so. In previous years
>> we have often counted 1200-1500, and I have heard reports of up to 3000.
>> 
>> Where are they?????
>> 
>> Happy fall migration!
>> 
>> Mary
>> 
>> 
>> ___________
>> My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness. The Dalai Lama
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> birding mailing list
>> birding at midvalleybirding.org
>> http://midvalleybirding.org/mailman/listinfo/birding
>> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 6
> Date: Fri, 13 Sep 2019 09:15:01 -0700
> From: nancy bee <bee.nancy at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [midvalleybirds] Corvallis Vaux's Swifts
> To: Roger Freeman <freemanbecard at gmail.com>
> Cc: Beverly Clark <clark.bev9 at gmail.com>,    Mid-Valley Nature
>    <mid-valley-nature at googlegroups.com>,
>    "corvallis-birding at googlegroups.com"
>    <corvallis-birding at googlegroups.com>,    Midvalley birders
>    <birding at midvalleybirding.org>,    Larry Schwitters <leschwitters at me.com>
> Message-ID: <EC227F28-CE37-4C6E-A7B7-9E9198C0BE3F at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=utf-8
> 
> I watched a hundred or so in the old world deli chimney downtown on Wednesday night. 
> 
> I did wonder where the big groups were. 
> 
> Travel and nature blog: https://nancybird375.wordpress.com/
> 
> 
>> On Sep 13, 2019, at 7:19 AM, Roger Freeman <freemanbecard at gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>> I watched close to 1000 swirling and funneling Swifts at the Silverton
>> Palace theatre chimney this past Tuesday evening (9/10) around 740-800 PM.
>> 
>> Roger Freeman
>> 
>>> On Thu, Sep 12, 2019 at 9:04 PM Mary Garrard <springazure1 at gmail.com> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Hi, Marge Alig and I and several neighbors observed 242 swifts enter a
>>> chimney at a private residence near Weigand Hall tonight. It was a lovely
>>> evening with a slight breeze and a few clouds to contrast against the pale
>>> pink sky at sunset. Sunset tonight was at 7:30. It’s always so much fun to
>>> watch the swifts as they swirl looselyl, then get more and more organized
>>> into a tighter group, then flutter down as they funnel into the chimney. It
>>> never gets old to me.
>>> 
>>> This migration the numbers I’ve seen at the chimney near the Mongolian
>>> Grill off First street downtown, and now at this private residence, have
>>> been much lower than in the past, from 80 to 300 or so. In previous years
>>> we have often counted 1200-1500, and I have heard reports of up to 3000.
>>> 
>>> Where are they?????
>>> 
>>> Happy fall migration!
>>> 
>>> Mary
>>> 
>>> 
>>> ___________
>>> My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness. The Dalai Lama
>>> 
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> birding mailing list
>>> birding at midvalleybirding.org
>>> http://midvalleybirding.org/mailman/listinfo/birding
>>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> birding mailing list
>> birding at midvalleybirding.org
>> http://midvalleybirding.org/mailman/listinfo/birding
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 7
> Date: Fri, 13 Sep 2019 10:55:40 -0700 (PDT)
> From: clearwater at peak.org
> Subject: [midvalleybirds] Fwd: American Avocet, phalaropes & more at
>    Sheridan sewage ponds 12 Sep
> To: Midvalley Birding Midvalley <birding at midvalleybirding.org>
> Message-ID:
>    <524998790.222974114.1568397340649.JavaMail.zimbra at peak.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
> 
> From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan at onlinenw.com> 
> Subject: [obol] American Avocet and more at Sheridan sewage ponds, 
> Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2019 15:41:04 -0700 
> 
> I visited (with permission) the Sheridan sewage ponds 11:30-2:00 today. 
> 
> I found 
> 2 Pied-billed grebe 
> 4 Greater White-fronted Geese 
> 10 Canada geese 
> 38 Mallards 
> 1 Pintail 
> 1 Am Wigeon 
> 1 Cinnamon Teal 
> 1008Shoveler 
> 8 Lesser Scaup 
> 9Hooded Merganser female 
> 2Ruddy Ducks -- only two!! 
> 1 Red-tailed hawk 
> 210 Coots 
> 0 BLACK-NECKED STILT - it's finally gone. Present 7/26 - 8/26 
> 1 AMERICAN AVOCET -- swimming in west pond - A COUNTY FIRST! 
> 12 Killdeer 
> 3 Spotted Sandpiper 
> 25 Western Sandpiper 
> 9 RED-NECKED PHALAROPE 
> 2 California Gull 
> 1 Kingfisher 
> 1 Kestrel 
> 1 BLACK PHOEBE 
> 2 Violet-green Swallow 
> 12 Barn Swallow 
> 20 Starlings 
> 3 Scrub jay 
> 17 Brewers Blackbird -- way down 
> 2 Am Goldfinch 
> 
> Good birding, everyone, 
> 
> Paul Sullivan 
> 
> From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan at onlinenw.com> 
> Subject: [obol] access to Sheridan sewage ponds 
> Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2019 16:19:20 -0700 
> 
> I was asked about access to the Sheridan sewage ponds. (save this) 
> 
> The Sheridan sewage pond complex is four ponds along the south side of Hwy 18. 
> Exit 31 off the highway will take you to Sheridan on the north side and to the federal prison on the south side. 
> See map on ECAS website: https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/2c5973_d013df50f00643a39e4c0a14cce93172.pdf 
> 
> 
> There are four points to view the Sheridan sewage ponds, three from the west side -- outside the fence of the ponds-- and one from the east side -- inside the fence. 
> 
> East side (weekdays): 
> 
> 1. The ponds may be accessed with permission from the manager only on weekdays, Monday - Friday, 8:30-2:30 PM. Call Joe Mitchell at 503-437-0666 or Steve Clark at 503-437-0693. With the nager's OK you can drive in through the gate on the east side of the ponds, park by the little building, and walk all the dikes (NO vehicles on the dike). This is so that if the federal prison sees someone out there and they call the manager, he can say, "They're just birdwatchers." This access lets you see all four ponds to your heart's content. 
> 
> West side (weekends): 
> 1. From exit 31 off Hwy 18, go south past the cemetery and turn in at Southside Park before the prison. There is a fishing pond, picnic shelter, toilets, etc. Walk to the east end of the fishing pond. u are close to the largest pond. You can look with a scope. You are down at the lever of the ponds, there is a screen of willows between you and the ponds. You can't see all the ponds. 
> 
> 2. Turn in at the cemetery, drive to the back, and park out of the way. You are on a hill; look down with a scope. You are farther away, but up higher. You can see all the ponds. Views are distant. You can see scoters, but peeps are just dots. 
> 
> 3. Return to the on-ramp, eastbound, onto Hwy 18. Half way down the ramp is a triangle where you can park off the ramp. You are lower and closer than the cemetery. You can see the south shore of the big pond. You can't see the farthest pond. 
> 
> If you park along the highway, you have only a limited area before you are too low to see over the dike. 
> 
> Good birding, 
> Paul Sullivan 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
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> End of birding Digest, Vol 162, Issue 10
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